The road into Manu (II): how will it affect local animal communities?crees Foundation

PERU, 23 Nov 2015 - Recognized by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site in 1987, Manu Biosphere Reserve – within which Manu National Park is contained – is one of the most biodiverse places in the world. The biosphere boasts an impressive 1000+ bird species – that’s approximately 10 per cent of the world’s bird species, over 200 mammals species, including the iconic jaguar, and 15 000+ plant species, and attracts thousands of nature enthusiasts and tourists every year.

Dr Chris Beirne, Crees’ Field Research Coordinator and co-author of a paper about the impact of unmarked roads in the Western Amazon on biodiversity, speaks to the potential impact that the proposed road into Manu may have on local fauna ...

 

Hands-on education: high school students travel to Manu to study applied researchcrees Foundation

PERU, 16 Sept 2015 - School field trips. The very combination of these words could probably still stir up feelings of uncontainable anticipation in those of us who are no longer even in school; after all, they weren’t just an escape from the classroom, but a chance to see how what we were learning could be applied.

Over the course of this year, the Manu Learning Centre (MLC) has enjoyed hosting a variety of student groups and expeditions, from local primary school students across the river to post-secondary students from across the proverbial pond ...

#rainforestlive: making a case for regenerating forestscrees Foundation

PERU, 19 May 2015 - Conservation Intern, Jack Mortimer, twirls a butterfly net in his right hand as he marches along the trail on his way to a transect – then he stops abruptly and concentrates on the loud rustling of leaves in the distance.

He had heard rumors back at the research base that woolly monkeys had been spotted just a few hundred meters into the reserve. Could it be them? ...

TREE TOP MANU: DOCUMENTING LIFE IN THE JUNGLE CANOPYCREES FOUNDATION

PERU, 14 May 2015 - With more than 60 feet between herself and the jungle floor, senior field staff member, Ruth Pillco Huarcaya, presses all of her weight into one of the footloops hanging from her harness. She’s another foot higher now and, secured by a Croll chest ascender, allows the long climbing rope to support her for a moment while she calculates her next move.

It’s been a tiring ascent – but that’s only half the battle. She still needs to perform a safe descent. As she unclips a rope from her chest ascender, a voice bellows from below and coaches her through the next steps ...

The road into Manu (I): how will it affect local human communities?crees Foundation

PERU, 18 Nov 2015 - “The trucks won’t come today,” says shop owner, Irma Apaza, as she rearranges what few tomatoes and onions remain on the near-empty shelves where fresh produce should be. She lifts her eyes to the door of her shop one last time in hopeful anticipation of hearing the familiar roar of a long-distance delivery truck, but resumes the task at hand when all that sounds is a rooster from across the road.

Located more than 200km from Cusco, the small town of Salvación is an entire day’s journey along a single, windy road over the Andes mountain range and down into the neo-tropical buffer zone of Manu National Park ...

More than a pretty pendant: the impact of butterfly exploitationcrees Foundation

PERU, 4 Nov 2015 - The glistening water of Locomayo River beckons on a hot day.

In the distance, a woman swings a butterfly net in a slow loop above her head. She suddenly snaps her wrist, folding the net on itself to prevent any possible catches from escaping, and slides it towards her. With a quick glimpse at the net, she thrusts it back up into the air – an acknowledgement that she failed to catch this time – and resumes trawling the space in front of her. This woman is not catching butterflies for fun. She is catching them for sale ...

A whole new wavelength: how acoustics are being used in sciencecrees Foundation

PERU, 5 Aug 2015 - Two hundred meters down Olivetti River, a young man stands ankle-deep in a shallow pool of water, kicking pebbles up from the riverbed. Sparse streams of sunlight cut through the rainforest canopy above and illuminate the pool as he moves around it; his movement is slow, methodical. With each kick, the water rises and falls, painting his wellington boots with wetness, and the pebbles underneath his feet swirl around excitedly before settling back into their resting place.

This may not sound like research – but it is ...

CARING ABOUT THE COLPA: THE THREAT TO MACAWS IN MANU BIOSPHERECREES FOUNDATION

PERU, 15 Apr 2015 - It’s five fifteen in the morning and a thin mist hovers over the Alto Madre de Dios River. The Amazon has been awake all night but this group of bleary-eyed volunteers is still rubbing sleep out of their eyes as they board a crees boat to cross the river.

They arrive at the beach hide in front of the Manu Learning Centre (MLC) Reserve just as the sun begins to peek up from the lowlands to the east, it’s warmth dispelling the mist they had travelled through ...